March of the Internet Nobody, day twenty seven: Nature photography week…

A whole week’s worth of nature photos, starting in the garden…

Diary of an Internet Nobody.

I think I’ve done quite well so far, in my attempt to post something interesting, entertaining, or at least different, every day for a month, and without resorting to simply posting a daily photo, too.

Well, until this week, anyway.

So for each of the final five days of my March marathon, I shall try to capture some original images of nature for your viewing pleasure; starting off with a regular subject of my photo posts, The Mound.

The area around the sloping corner bed in the dappled shade of our back garden has provided us with variety, interest and seasonal splashes of colour since we cleared the overgrown mass of weeds which covered it when we moved in. Now, with a few days of sunshine and warmth, the garden in general and The Mound in particular, is coming back to life.

And here’s a tune that ties in rather…

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Garden evolution…

It’s good to have a document of how our garden has grown from the unkempt and overgrown blank canvas that we began with, to the oasis of colour, form and texture that we have made for ourselves.

I’ve posted many photos of The Mound, both here and on Diary of an Internet Nobody, but it’s a continually evolving part of the garden which started off like this…

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…a dead tree stump, overgrown with bluebells, wild garlic and long, unidentified green things, along with a few stems of ash and hawthorn (from seeds of the trees which used to overhang the patio).

And in the last week or so, leading up to today and the glorious bank holiday sunshine, the garden now looks this…

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Finally; it might not look exactly like this, but here was Audrey’s fairy garden, beneath the fiery red canopy of the pieris, after a little creative manipulation.

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Heading for a Fall…

Signal connection problems at home and a busy writing schedule are the twin excuses I’m using to explain my photographic hiatus of late, but as my tenuous link to the internet appears to have finally stabilised, I plan on posting on here more regularly again.

For now, here are a few snaps from the weekend, a couple of sunny/hazy/warm/chilly days in the garden and at the local wildfowl reserve.
There’s a definite autumnal feel to everything…

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“Swan-bergs”

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Sculpting the landscape…

I was recently contacted by someone from Artsy, a company that specializes in selling the work of artists and promoting galleries, because they had seen a post I wrote a couple of years ago on Diary of an Internet Nobody about the abundance of outdoor sculpture we have in the south west.

The gentleman who got in touch was specifically interested in the fact that I had published photos of Damien Hirst‘s giant statue, Verity, that stands on the seafront at Ilfracombe in North Devon.

Verity is a breathtaking piece of work, standing guard over the small harbour, towering over residents and tourists alike, her stance giving the appearance of a benevolent colossus or avenging angel, brandishing the divine sword and scales of justice as she gazes out to sea, keeping a watchful eye out for invaders.

Hirst's Verity statue.

The sculpture is very much part of the town’s landscape now, but when she initially arrived Verity was a controversial figure, with one side of her imposing, pregnant frame flayed of skin, the surface of her body peeled away to reveal her unborn child and other anatomical details.

Hirst's Verity, flayed side

You can watch Verity being lifted into place in this clip.

Hirst is one of the most talked about, original and talented modern artists to have come out of the UK in recent years, so I am very honoured to have been asked by Artsy to include this link to the Damien Hirst page of their site where you can find out more about the man himself and view the catalogue of his extraordinary work.

But as I said, there is a huge variety of outdoor artwork to marvel at in Devon, be it municipal art in the centre of towns or private sculpture gardens in the beautiful countryside, wherever you go, you are never far from the next striking artistic installation.

"Family" statue, Barnstaple, North Devon

Scrap metal "Predator" sculpture, Lynmouth

Stone lane Mythic Gardens, Chagford

Broomhill Art Hotel

Stone lane Mythic Gardens, Chagford

Broomhill Art Hotel

Stone lane Mythic Gardens, Chagford

Broomhill Art Hotel

Stone lane Mythic Gardens, Chagford

Broomhill Art Hotel

War Memorial, Wollacombe

Broomhill Art Hotel

Broomhill Art Hotel

Broomhill Art Hotel

Broomhill Art Hotel

Broomhill Art Hotel

Back in the garden…

Having managed to dodge the rain for long enough to do a spot of tidying up in the garden, I thought I’d post a few photos to chronicle the progress of our little oasis of calm.
Although the calm was disturbed somewhat the other day, by a feuding group of hedgehogs.

We’ve been working on the faux-woodland area on the raised berm in the back corner. It’s over-hung with trees, providing some dappled shade for the bugle, ivy, impatiens and primroses that nestle amongst the bark chippings.

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Around the edges of the patio we have vegetables, climbers and a colourful drift of crocosmia, with more seedlings and a new clematis, added this weekend…

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…and just because I like it, there’s this.

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